Category Archives: culture

The Eurasian Community’s Contribution to Malaysia

Enriching the Cosmopolitan Nature and Fabric of the Country

The Eurasian community in Malaysia is tiny by comparison to the other races. A Eurasian is someone of mixed Asian and European ancestry. The Malays form the majority with over 60 percent, the Chinese now make up about 25 percent and the Indians about 8 percent. There are close to 30,000 Eurasians in the country which has a population of about 30 million.

Types of Eurasians

Even though they are a tiny community, there are a number of divisions within this community. Some much prefer to position themselves as Portuguese Eurasians and are proud of their roots. Many of these older Portuguese Eurasians speak Kristang at home and with their relatives. Closer home, my wife’s late mother, a Portuguese Eurasian used to converse with ease in Kristang with her sisters, brothers and children. My wife too still retains that ability to speak this language.

Descriptions over the Ages

Initially, when the Malays first saw the Portuguese soldiers, sailors and administrative officials, they called them, ‘Benggali Puteh’. I will leave it to you to make an educated guess as to how this came about.

Some of these Portuguese officials married local women and their offspring were called Nasrani. This was a clear reference to the people of Nazareth because of their Catholic faith. Much later and still in use is the local Bahasa Malaysia term ‘ Serani’ meaning Eurasian.

Dutch Burghers

Other Eurasians were known as Dutch Burghers and still others were once known as Anglo-Indians. Dutch Burghers are actually of mixed Dutch, Portuguese and Sri Lankan descent.  Some of these Eurasians are trying, to some extent, to maintain links and association with Holland. I do know that some individuals and their families meet for social events with Dutch Embassy officials in Malaysia. This is most understandable because it is an intrinsic human desire to trace and thereafter appreciate your roots, especially as you grow older!

Anglo-Indians

These individuals first came to then Malaya from India during the British colonial period. They were at that time known as Anglo-Indians. Today, most of these people are simply classified as Eurasians. The descriptions Dutch Burgher and Anglo-Indian are not in vogue these days.

500th Anniversary of the Coming of the Portuguese to Malacca

The Portuguese Eurasians celebrated in a grand manner the 500th Anniversary of the coming of the Portuguese to Malacca from 26 to 29 October 2011. The celebrations were held in Malacca and drew many attendees from Singapore, Australia and all over Malaysia.

The Portuguese Eurasian community in Malacca has an elected leader. He is known as the Regedor.  Regedor actually refers to the settlement headman. He has an administrative role as well as a role as a cultural leader.

The Portuguese Eurasians at that time in the settlement were mostly fishermen eking out a living. It was a tough, risky and demanding job but they somehow managed to survive and carry on. This was, in part, due to their strong faith as Catholics.

However, there was much dissatisfaction within the community at a particular period in time not too long ago and many turned to an opposition party for support and assistance.  The Portuguese Eurasians felt that their interests and welfare were being neglected.

Facility to Invest

The Malaysian government recognised this trend. In an effort to make amends, the government belatedly recognised this tiny community as worthy of special attention and granted them the privilege of investing in a fund meant for only bumiputras. Bumiputra means son of the soil.

All Portuguese Eurasians could apply to invest in this fund if he or she could provide proof of ancestry. For this, the individual concerned had to obtain a certain form from the regedor, fill it up and then get the regedor’s confirmation of his / her eligibility. Many Eurasians did take advantage of this facility.

What Has Been the Eurasian Community’s Contribution to Malaysia

Although the Eurasians are a tiny community, they have and continue to make a significant contribution to the nation in a number of fields.

Sports

The Shepherdson brothers, the legendary Mike and his younger brother Christie, both double internationals in hockey and cricket, and Olympians to boot, have had a chequered career in these two sports. Other members of the family were also great sportsmen.

You may also remember Olympians like Lawrence Van Huizen, his son Stephen, Brian Sta Maria and Colin Sta Maria and Kevin Nunis all from that venerable St Paul’s Institution in Seremban.

These are just those individuals that come to mind. There are many other Eurasians who have made a similar contribution.

Culture

1.There is that well known Kristang former teacher and prolific writer from Malacca, Joan Marbeck now living in Singapore. Kristang is a Creole language. Food for thought: more than 90 per cent of Portuguese words come from Greek and Latin. A similar local language also exists in the Special Administrative Region (SAR) Macau where the Portuguese once ruled.

Joan has published many books especially on Kristang. Two of her books are titled: Ungua Adanza ( An Inheritance ) 1995 and Linggu Mai ( Mother Tongue ) 2004. What is amazing is that Portugal only ruled in Malacca for 130 years but left such a rich legacy. I understand that academics from Portugal and Brazil visit Malacca from time to time to research on these matters.

2.Joan’s sister, Celine is also a well known former teacher, hotel manager and now a renowned Kristang chef. Celine has given many cooking demonstrations and classes in Malaysia and Singapore. Celine has also been invited to give cooking demonstrations in Amsterdam, Holland. She has also, to her credit, published two well-received cookbooks.

3. Music Ambassadors: Here the Eurasians have certainly made a huge contribution. They seem to be musically gifted and there are numerous singers, musicians and bands that come to mind.

From the unforgettable, late Jimmy Boyle, Rudy and George Baum, James Rozells, Katherine Rodrigues, Coleen Read, Bonnie and Homer Jeremiah of Penang to the current sensations, the Zarsardias Brothers, country and western band Os Pombos, Yellow Jackets from Klang and Tres Amigos from Malacca have all made a significant contribution. I am sure that there are many other Eurasians who have left their mark in the music world.

Malacca Portuguese Eurasian Cuisine

There are many of these dishes. They vary from family to family. The main idea here was to make bland European food more delicious and palatable with the infusion of spices. The Malacca Portuguese Eurasians have over the years perfected this to a great degree. One can find a few Malacca Portuguese restaurants both here in Kuala Lumpur and Petaling Jaya as well as in Malacca.

These are some of the dishes that come to mind: Easily the most famous and much loved is Curry Debal (Devil Curry). The others, in no fixed order of preference, are: Ambiler, Abarjaw, Pongteh, Prawn and Pineapple Curry, Fish and Mango Curry and Eurasian Chicken Stew.

The Eurasians have also garnered well-earned praise for their expertise in the baking of Sugee cakes. This is usually baked for special occasions like Christmas, weddings, baptisms and even funerals. During the Annual Penang Eurasian Festival, for instance, there is even a Sugee Cake Making Contest. 

Teachers and Administrators

The early Eurasians, during British colonial rule, naturally gravitated towards the teaching profession. They also entered the civil service as administrators. Their fluency and command of the English language and their understanding of English customs and traditions made this a good fit.

Much later, and after Malaya gained independence, the Eurasians were also attracted to the armed forces. Quite a number rose to senior military positions i.e. colonel, brigadier general, first admiral etc.

In addition, there are also a few Eurasians who have made it to the big time, business-wise. These individuals have chosen, quite prudently, to operate under the radar and have remained low key by choice. A few have also left their mark as academics in local and foreign universities.

A Matter Bedevilling the Community

I have attended a few events hosted by Eurasians both here in Kuala Lumpur and even in Penang. What struck me as quite poignant and sad was the way a senior Eurasian leader, in his late seventies, spoke about the recurring lack of unity within the community in Penang a few years ago.

He wondered why this was so and commented that this lack of unity was really holding the community back from achieving its lofty goals. I subsequently spoke to a few Eurasian friends in Penang and inquired if this was really the case. Both of them confirmed the matter. This was re-confirmed by another Eurasian friend in Petaling Jaya.

The Eurasian male and female in Malaysia is generally perceived to be someone who is comfortable in social situations. Eurasians love to sing, enjoy good music and are musically inclined, love to go clubbing, delight in having a drink or two and are generally quite adept on the dance floor. In short, the Eurasian is seen as someone who yearns for a slice of la dolce vita. Isn’t that what we all want?

Santorini is Stunningly Splendid in Every Way

Towering Cliffs, White Washed Buildings and Turquoise Blue Waters

My wife and I embarked on our fifth cruise recently. We chose a Norwegian Cruise Line (NCL) ship, the Norwegian Star for the seven-night cruise to the exotic Greek Islands.

How many of us know that Greece has actually 1200 to 6000 islands depending on the minimum size one takes into account? Of this huge number, only about 160 plus islands are inhabited.

We also went on a shore excursion in Kotor, Montenegro at the start of the cruise and another shore excursion in Dubrovnik, Croatia on the last leg of the cruise. ‘Kotor’ in Bahasa Malaysia means dirty. I was, as such, intrigued by the name.

Montenegro is one of the six republics that made up the former Yugoslavia under one of the Non-Aligned Movement’s (NAM) strongman named Tito.

Montenegro Was a Disappointment

Kotor was not dirty but it was drab looking. It was a real waste of time because it took about an hour’s drive to get to our first destination through a bleak and dreary countryside with no redeeming or outstanding features. The ancient city of Budva was a little better and it is kissed by the open Adriatic Sea. It had some interesting buildings.

However, the people of Montenegro did not seem friendly to the throngs of people visiting the area. In addition and this is a big point, whilst they desperately want the tourists, they have yet to provide proper and easily accessible clean toilets. This is a major drawback. Many in our group found this absence of proper and accessible toilets a real turn off.

Dubrovnik Is a Beautiful City

A day before we returned to Venice, Italy we made a stopover in Dubrovnik, Croatia.

We had heard rave reviews about Dubrovnik and many commented that it is a beautiful city.  In fact, we know of a couple, friends of ours from Canberra, Australia, who spent four weeks on vacation in Dubrovnik two years ago. They liked the city a lot. And so it was a great relief that all these reviews and commentaries were actually spot on.

Dubrovnik is certainly a beautiful and well laid out city with a charm of its own. We chose to go on the Croatian Riviera and Dubrovnik tour. It turned out to be a great choice. The drive through the picturesque villages was most enjoyable and we got to see cattle and goats grazing in the fields against the backdrop of the beautiful mountains.

Cascading Waters of Ljuta River

The highlight of the tour through the fertile Konavle Valley for us was the stop for a light snack at a restaurant located in an old mill next to the cascading waters of the Ljuta River. The setting was simply ideal and one could see and hear the rush of crystal clean water from the nearby mountain as one contemplated the unbelievably scenic and peaceful surroundings.

The delightful light snack consisted of local specialities such as Croatian smoked ham, cheese, homemade bread and a glass of local wine. The charming waitresses dressed in their colourful national costumes offered us a choice of red or white wine.

Corfu Captivates the Visitor

During our cruise, we had a chance to make three other shore excursions to the following Greek islands: Mykonos, Corfu and Santorini. Of these, Santorini really impressed me a lot.

In Corfu, we chose to go on the Achilleion Palace and Corfu Town tour. We drove through the lovely countryside dotted with lemon and olive trees to reach the charming village of Gastouri where the majestic Achilleion Palace stands. While driving throughout Greece we noticed that the roads are in good condition and well maintained. The palace has beautiful gardens full of exotic flowers surrounding the building.

We also enjoyed our walk from the tree-lined main square to the Old Town. Here we saw historical sites such as the Venetian quarters, the Town Hall and the Church of St. Spyridon, patron saint of Corfu. The shops and sights of the Old Town were quite interesting and my wife did some shopping here. We also had time for a light snack in one of the many breezy cafes.

Santorini: Breathtaking in its Beauty

As we got into the tender from our cruise ship which had anchored some distance from the port and headed out to the island of Santorini, I was struck by its imposing sight. The island has an incredible majesty about it as one approaches.

The island formed as a result of a volcanic eruption thousands of years ago is a sight to behold with its rugged and craggy face. According to experts that volcanic eruption was ten times more powerful than the one from Krakatova, Indonesia in 1883!

The city of 15,000 inhabitants is situated on an island in the Southern Aegean Sea. It certainly has highly acclaimed and dramatic views and stunning sunsets. And to make matters really dramatic, Santorini is perched on the rim of a massive active volcano.

White Washed Buildings & Towering Cliffs

White washed buildings are a regular and most pleasant feature in Greece. If your building/house faces the sea, then you are only allowed to paint your wooden window frames in the colour blue. If your house faces the hillside, then you can paint the window frames in brown. All houses must be white-washed. This decree by a dictator many years ago still remains in force.

Dancing to Zorba the Greek

We had our lunch in a modern, well-built Greek restaurant named Pyrgos Tavern situated in one of the oldest settlements and the highest village on the island. We enjoyed traditional Greek food, music, wine and dances. The food was very good but I thought they should have included lamb, octopus and squid in the buffet menu.

The fun part was the Greek style celebration – OPA! A couple of dances were performed by four Greek lasses in traditional costumes and this was followed by a livelier version of dancing much like in the movie, Zorba the Greek starring Anthony Quinn. This time, a male dancer joined in and he was equal to the task and gave a spirited display of his prowess in this field. Then the lasses and the male dancer approached the diners and invited them on to the dance floor. Soon the place was throbbing to the sounds of good music and lively dancing.

Finally, all present had a smashing time breaking plates with much joy and gusto. I must mention here that throughout our trip to the Greek islands, there was easy availability of clean and well-maintained toilets. For some of them, one has to pay a small fee to use.

Some Interesting Facts about Santorini

Here are some interesting facts about Santorini.

  1. The seas around Santorini are a shimmering turquoise blue. Really beautiful to behold. The only other place where I have seen the seas so beautiful is in the Caribbean island of Barbados.
  2. There are more churches on the island than homes. These small churches were built by grateful sailors in honour of the saints who saved them from a watery grave while at sea.
  3. The export of pumice stones is a big business on the island.
  4. There are more than 100 varieties of grapes on Santorini. The island produces good quality wine and more than 89% is white wine.
  5. There are more donkeys than men on the islands. Donkeys are used to carry goods and the luggage of tourists up the steep, winding slopes and steps all around the islands.

How Did We Get to the Top of the Island?

We travelled up to the mountain top in a comfortable bus driven by a very experienced and capable driver. He needed to be experienced to be able to drive with some degree of sure-footedness up the very narrow winding road. At some points, it was quite scary to look out at the scenes below us but it was not a white-knuckle drive all the way. We enjoyed the breathtaking scenery as the bus slowly snaked its way up the narrow mountain roads.

We had three options for descending from the mountain. One was by slowly trekking down the 500 plus steps to the bottom. The other was to hitch a bumpy and smelly donkey ride down. We all opted for the third option and that was to take the cable car down in just a few minutes. Incidentally, the cable car system was built and donated by a rich and well-established family on the island as its community service contribution.

One Final Thought

If I have the opportunity and the time, I would certainly like to re-visit both Santorini and Dubrovnik. There is so much more to know, experience and enjoy about these two amazing places. One needs to spend at least a week in each place to soak in the atmosphere and explore the hidden nooks and corners of these exotic places. And this time around, I will certainly be a traveller and not a tourist.

#travel #Dubrovnik #Santorini #Corfu #Montenegro

Celebrating Thaipusam in Malaysia

An Exotic Mix of Preparation, Sacrifice and Devotion

Malaysia is a country of over 30 million people. In peninsula Malaysia, there are three main races: Malays ( over 60% ), Chinese ( about 25 % ) and Indians ( about 8 % ).

In the East Malaysian state of Sabah on the island of Borneo, the races comprise Kadazandusuns with their own paramount leader and the Chinese, Bajau, Malay, Bugis and Murut. In Sarawak, the other East Malaysian state, the major races are Iban, Bidayuh, Melanau, Chinese, Malay, Tagal, Orang Ulu, and Penan.

Melting Pot of Races

As befitting a melting pot of many races, cultures and traditions, Malaysians celebrate a wide range of pretty diverse festivals. These range from the Gawai Festival in Sarawak, the Kaamatan Festival of Sabah, Hari Raya and Hari Raya Haji, Chinese New Year, Hungry Ghosts Festival, Moon Cake Festival, Wesak Day,  Deepavali, Ponggal, Thaipusam and Christmas to name a few.

Most of these are actually harvest festivals. Moon Cake Festival, for instance, is the 2nd most important festival for the Chinese. During the Hungry Ghosts Festival, the belief is that dead souls ( hungry ghosts ) return to briefly visit living relatives!

The above list is not all inclusive but it does give one an idea of the range of festivals that are celebrated in cosmopolitan Malaysia. One of these festivals is the subject of this blog posting. It is a truly splendid display of religious piety in an otherwise materialistic, hedonistic and imperfect world.

Thaipusam Leaves One Spellbound

Thaipusam is a grand and enthralling Hindu festival in the Tamil diaspora.  It is celebrated with much preparation, sacrifice and devotion not just in Malaysia but also in Mauritius, Singapore, Seychelles, Fiji, South Africa, Guyana and Trinidad and Tobago in the Caribbean.

Malaysia’s celebration is, however, among the largest in the world drawing over a million and a half devotees to the imposing Batu Caves on the outskirts of Kuala Lumpur. There are also similar celebrations in other major Malaysian cities like Georgetown in Penang and in Ipoh, Perak.

Thaipusam has, however, become less a strictly Hindu affair and more a distinctly Malaysian one. There are also a number of Malaysian Chinese devotees who participate in this festival, especially in Penang. Many foreigners and tourists alike gather along the route of the slow moving chariot procession from the main temple in Kuala Lumpur to Batu Caves to watch this amazing spectacle of deep rooted faith.

The Rituals that are Followed

Kavadi is a ceremonial sacrifice practised by devotees during the worship of Lord Murugan. There are a few types of kavadis from simple ones to more elaborate kavadis.

The simple kavadi is basically a short wooden pole surmounted by a wooden arch. Pictures or statues of Lord Murugan or other deities are fixed onto the arch. A small pot of milk is attached to each end of the pole.

The more elaborate alagu and ratha kavadis are carried by devotees during Thaipusam. Kavadis are affixed on a bearer’s body by long sharpened rods or by chains and small hooks.

Observing Physical and Mental Discipline

Devotees who wish to carry kavadis are required to strictly observe physical and mental discipline. Purification of the body is a must. This includes consuming just simple vegetarian meals and observing celibacy over a 48 day period prior to carrying the kavadi on Thaipusam day.

Piercing the skin, tongue or cheeks with vel skewers is also common. This prevents the devotees from speaking and grants them great powers of endurance.

Body Should Not Be Harmed

There is some confusion over whether Thaipusam is banned in India. Some individuals think it is only the practice of piercing the skin, tongue or cheeks that is banned. Hinduism advocates that the body should not be harmed as the body is like a temple where the soul resides.

This extreme Hindu religious ritual lives on as a recognised holiday in some Malaysian states! An individual and a non-Indian who was truly captivated by this festival and Hinduism, in general, is Dr.Carl Vadivella  Belle.

Honorary Hindu Chaplin

Dr Belle, a career diplomat, had served in the Australian High Commission in Kuala Lumpur from 1976 to 1979. ( High Commission is the term used to describe an embassy from a Commonwealth country. The ambassador is referred to as a High Commissioner ) Dr Belle has maintained a long-term interest in Malaysian social, political and religious issues.

His doctoral dissertation, ‘ Thaipusam in Malaysia: A Hindu Festival Misunderstood?’ was accepted by Deakin University in 2004. Dr Belle was appointed Inaugural Hindu Chaplin at Flinders University in South Australia in 2005. During Thaipusam 2017, he provided expert advice to a BBC television team.

Tracing the Layers of Meaning

In his second book,’ Thaipusam in Malaysia: A Hindu Festival in the Tamil Diaspora’  Dr Belle closely examines the popular festival from the ‘ inside ‘ and attempts to trace the layers of meaning and the recondite vocabularies of this multifaceted and complex celebration in terms of its continuing relevance to Malaysian Hindus.

Dr Belle concludes that far from being a cultural aberration, Thaipusam is a product of time, place and the peculiar circumstances of Hindus in Malaysia.

He believes that constructed from deep-rooted elements of South Indian culture, Thaipusam can be fully comprehended by locating it within Tamil history, philosophies and belief structures, in particular, those associated with Lord Murugan.

Dr Belle gave a talk recently on this interesting subject matter in Penang. Those who are keen on obtaining a copy of the book can write to Areca Books at info@arecabooks.com for more details.  Alternatively, you can purchase a copy from the heritage bookseller at its book shop at 15 Jalan Masjid Kapitan Keling, George Town, Penang 10200, Malaysia.

Connecting the Lights

Facts, Mysteries and Eurasians

Two weeks ago, I received an email notification of a very interesting and fascinating Sunday afternoon programme at a leading hotel in Penang. After carefully perusing the attached flyer, I decided to make a trip up north and to attend the programme which incidentally featured a distinguished panel of speakers.

What does the average Malaysian know about Francis Light and Colonel William Light?

Now what was this programme, ‘ Connecting The Lights “ all about? It was about Sir Captain Francis Light, the founder of Penang, his son Colonel William Light and his wife and William’s mother, Lady Martina Rozzels.

What does the average Malaysian know about Francis Light and Colonel William Light? Who was that elusive and highly attractive Eurasian Lady, Martina Rozzels? So little is written or captured about her in the various historical documents.

Penang Continues to Fascinate

I must confess that I have always been fascinated with the island. Part of the reason could be that I spent a good two years on that island during my younger days at the small teacher training college, St Joseph’s Training College, meant to prepare La Salle Brothers to be teachers.

The La Salle Brothers also took in a few lay students, like me, who after training taught alongside the La Salle Brothers in the many mission schools throughout Malaysia. My college hostel was in Burmah Road and right in the heart of Pulau Tikus and next to the Eurasian Village ( Kampong Serani ).

Cultural Melting Pot

In addition, the whole island was and still is a cultural melting pot. I could see on a daily basis a procession of young Thai girls, dressed stylishly in jeans of all hues walking past our hostel. They were on their way to the local commercial institute in the area to be trained in typewriting, shorthand and secretarial skills.

In addition, when we attended local parties on some weekends, there was always a good mix of guests: Chinese, Malays, Indians, Eurasians and even Australians. The Royal Australian Air Force had a base in Penang and its personnel mixed very well with the locals.

Even then, Penang was an established culinary paradise. It had such an array of local dishes and one only needed to know where to go for a particular dish. For me then, it was Gurney Drive for char kueh teow and Dato Keramat for Leng Chee Kiang and / or Lobak! There were other places to go to for Nasi Kandar,  Assam Laksa and Cendol.

Distinguished Panel of Speakers

The organisers of the event, George Town Festival, had invited the following individuals: Marcus Langdon, a Penang-based author; Datuk Wira Mohd Shariff, a Kedah historian and a former district officer in Kedah; Kelly Henderson, a social activist and Parklands advocate from Adelaide; and Dato Dr. Anthony Sibert, Eurasian historian.

One of the collaborators in the event was The Royale Bintang Penang, a 4-star hotel which is housed in a heritage building built in the 1890s which belonged to Boustead & Company. This event was also to mark and celebrate the 30th anniversary of the Penang Heritage Trust.

Marcus Langdon’s Contribution

Marcus Langdon was given the honour of making the first presentation.

Marcus has extensive knowledge of Penang’s early history because he has spent many years and much time researching the matter. He himself has a connection to Penang because one of his great, great grandfathers was the principal of Penang Free School!

In addition, Marcus has published two major books: Penang – The Fourth Presidency of India 1803 to 1830 Volume 1 ( Ships, Men and Mansions ) and Volume 2 ( Fire, Spice and Edifice ).

Some Facts about Francis Light

We were informed by Marcus that Francis Light enlisted in the Royal Navy at the tender age of thirteen! We were also told that he was a linguist. Francis Light could speak Bahasa Malaysia / Indonesia very well. He was also conversant with the local customs and traditions and was able to get along well with both the Sultan of Kedah as well as the Thai King. He also served for a brief period in Aceh, Indonesia. Believe or not, he was able to even read and write Jawi.

He could not only speak the Thai language quite well but he had taken the trouble to master the refined form of the Thai language used in the Royal Court. This must have surely impressed the royal families in both Kedah and Thailand.

What this indicates quite clearly is that Francis Light was a self-made man who believed in the concept of life-long education.

In addition, we were informed that Francis Light was a man of impressive diplomatic skills. Furthermore, he was equally adept in negotiations and was considered a superb negotiator.

Keep in mind that this was a man who had enlisted in the Royal Navy at the age of thirteen. What this indicates quite clearly is that Francis Light was a self-made man who believed in the concept of life-long education. All these remarkable qualities and abilities of his must have impressed his ultimate bosses in the East India Company ( EIC ) in Calcutta, India.

Enigmatic Lady Martina Rozzels

Lady Martina Rozzels remains to this day an enigma! What we do know is that she somehow managed to capture the heart of Francis Light. She had two children with Francis Light… a son, Colonel William Light and a daughter.

William Light, like his illustrious father, also joined the Royal Navy initially but later on, he became an army officer rising to the exalted rank of colonel. Part of the reason for his rapid rise in the military may have been due to his birthplace being given as Suffolk, England. He was thus seen and accepted as an Englishman. Was this for strategic and career reasons?  In actual fact, he was born in Penang and is a bona fide Eurasian.

One of the speakers at the event, Datuk Wira Mohd Shariff made a fairly startling claim. According to him, a Kedah princess named Siti Zubaidah had taken on the identity of Martina Rozzels in order to marry Francis Light. She had used this Portuguese name to assume that identity. This revelation, for what it is worth, only deepens the mystery of who actually is Lady Martina Rozzels.

There are other accounts that state Lady Martina Rozzels moved from Phuket to Penang with a number of other Eurasian family members because of war and unrest in the Thai island at that time. She is to be credited, in part, for opening the doors for the La Salle Brothers coming to Penang. St Xavier’s Institution was the first La Salle school to be established in Malaysia.

Contributions from the Other Speakers

The other speakers, Datuk Wira Mohd Shariff and Kelly Henderson also gave brief presentations. Datuk Wira touched on the Kedah connections in general while Kelly Henderson talked about William Light’s role in the founding of Adelaide.

William Light admired his father’s role in the founding of Penang and wanted to leave a similar mark. As such, just as Francis Light has a statue in his honour in Penang, William Light too has a statue in his honour in Adelaide. Like father, like son!

Like his father, William Light too was a noted linguist. His plans for the city of Adelaide are considered priceless, especially his efforts at surveying for the ideal spot to locate the city. It is readily acknowledged that his decision to locate the city in that particular part was simply brilliant.

Dato Dr. Anthony Sibert however, did not turn up due to unavoidable circumstances. His contribution was nevertheless presented very briefly by one of the organisers.

Kudos to Joe Sidek

Credit should be given to a remarkable person i.e. Joe Sidek for the success of the event. As festival director for the George Town Festival for many years, he has managed to make it a successful annual happening.

It should be borne in mind that the George Town Festival started out as a celebration of George Town’s heritage status. The fact that it has since evolved into an international showcase of arts, culture and music is a great tribute to Joe Sidek, his team and the enthusiastic volunteers who lend valuable support for its various activities.